The camera caught Steve Hornís attention at an early age. When he was young, he stood in a field at night to take a picture of the full moon. Looking through a lens, he loved the experience of bringing the moon into focus and then capturing it with a picture. Years later, with his keen eye for the natural world and flare for spontaneity, Steve chose photography as a full time profession. Graduating as an Independent Scholar in Photography from Amherst College, he trained with fine art photographer Paul Caponigro.

Steve has been a professional photographer since the mid-1980s specializing in documentary, portrait, and wedding work, including many years as visual arts photographer at Bumbershoot, the Seattle International Festival of the Arts. His photography has been displayed in exhibits in the U.S. and Japan, and is in the collections of Amherst College, Yale University and the Seattle Arts Commission among others.

Pictures Without Borders: Bosnia Revisited, Steve's first photography book, was called “a remarkable testament to the power of photography to reach across borders and across national boundaries” by the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Emory University created and hosted an exhibition of this work, which then travelled nationally. A grant from CEC ArtsLink took the show to four cities in Bosnia and Herzegovina during 2010.

Steve has shared his love of photography as a guest lecturer at the Tisch School of the Arts in New York City, at Tufts University's documentary photography program, and at the annual Visual Journalism Conference at Western Washington University.

The American Society of Media Photographers (ASMP) honored Steve in 2009 by selecting his work as one of their “Best of 2009”. The ASMP is the world's largest society of professional photographers.

Steve photographs primarily on Lopez Island, Orcas Island, and San Juan Island in Northwest Washington State. He also travels nationally for clients who seek his sensitive and evocative style.


“I love the ways that photographs can convey a sense of place, and a time in someoneís life. I feel that itís my calling as a photographer to share and preserve our individual and collective stories.”